Monday, December 21, 2009

Crash Course: Top Five Games to Increase Your Gamer Literacy

Are you on the fringes of gaming? Do you want to get in deeper, but find yourself unsure where to start? Do conversations with experienced gamers leave you feeling lost? Is "sorry, but our princess is in another castle" your freshest gaming joke? When it comes to gamer culture, are you on the outside looking in?



Have no fear: Doctor Professor is here!

Monday, December 14, 2009

Buy Before You Try: The Problem With Pre-Orders

Pre-ordering a videogame is, on the face of it, a pretty dumb thing to do most of the time. You're agreeing, before you can possibly know if the game is any good, to buy it for the most it will ever cost - and most videogames depreciate pretty quickly. Before pre-order bonuses, the only real tack game-sellers could take to try to convince you to do this was to point out that it would guarantee you'd get a copy on launch day, even if the game sold out completely - but that almost never actually happens.

For the other parties in the transaction, however, it's a great deal. It ensures a certain minimum number of sales, and allows demand to be gauged and thus indicates how large production runs should be. And if there are enough pre-orders, this fact can be used in the game's marketing and drive sales up even higher. So it's not too surprising that incentives would start appearing to make pre-ordering more appealing for consumers.

Wednesday, December 9, 2009

I'm Not Evil, I Just Play That Way: Player Motivations and Character Goals

Recently we took a look at the technique of option restriction, which is when a game presents the player with only one path forward, thus eliminating choice while maintaining agency. If it's handled well, it allows for close management of narrative progression while still letting the player feel that they are in control. So what is it that determines whether it's handled well? What allows the player's sense of control to be maintained even with a lack of choice?

"Players like to feel in control, but this sensation doesn't necessarily come from having the ability to choose. Having control is as simple as doing what you want to do. It's possible for players to feel in control even if they don't actually have the ability to choose, as long as the what the game asks and what the player wants aligns. A good narrative should foster this."
—Andrew Vanden Bossche, Would You Kindly? BioShock And Free Will