Monday, February 22, 2010

The Choice Is Not Yours: Why Prince of Persia Has The Best (And Worst) Ending In Modern Videogames

WARNING: THIS ESSAY CONTAINS EXTREME SPOILERS. IF YOU HAVE NOT PLAYED PRINCE OF PERSIA AND INTEND TO DO SO, DO IT BEFORE READING THIS ESSAY.

The game is called "Prince of Persia." But it's not really about the Prince. (He doesn't even seem to be a prince this time. We call him "the Prince" because he has no name.) Really, the game is about (legitimate princess) Elika.

Princess Elika

As the game opens, the Prince is lost in a sandstorm, calling out for Farah. Franchise veterans will recognize the name as that of the love interest from the Sands of Time trilogy - but it is soon revealed that Farah is actually the name of this Prince's donkey, laden with the riches the Prince has recently looted.

It's a nod to the previous games, but it's also a dig at Princess Farah's characterization and gameplay role. She was little more than a pack animal. The Prince, lost in the storm, is trying to reconnect with her, trying to return to that simplicity. Instead, he finds Elika.

Monday, February 15, 2010

Love By Proxy: Relying on Fake Relationships

I have a cold today.

I could feel it coming on yesterday, and it sent me early to bed, but today it is full-blown. I'm not gonna lie - I've always kind of liked being just a little bit sick. Sick enough to guiltlessly stay in bed playing videogames all day (punctuated by naps and plenty of fluids) but not so sick that I can't enjoy it.

I could play Prototype - the game I'm lately live-tweeting. But when I'm sick, I want a game that takes me to a happy place. Prototype may be a hell of a lot of fun, but it is sure not happy. Alex Mercer's New York is a hellhole and his life is horrible. I may have a great time behind the controller, but he's having a terrible one on the screen.

The whole point of escapism is that you escape to a better situation, not a worse one. Prototype is great for blowing off steam, but if I want to bury myself in another existence for a while, to forget about this one and the runny noses that come along with it, I play a game like Star Ocean.

Thursday, February 11, 2010

PSA: Don't Buy Sonic Chronicles. Seriously.

I don't usually post anything in the middle of the week. This isn't a normal, full essay. But I had to get it out there. I had to save people who might otherwise have bought this game.


Sonic Chronicles: The Dark Brotherhood is a terrible, terrible game. Did you notice I didn't link the title to the Amazon page? That's because I don't want you to buy it. I don't even want to risk the possibility of you accidentally buying it. I can only imagine the wrath I would have right now if I had paid any money for it myself. As it is, I ripped it right out of my DS, stuffed it back into the GameFly envelope, and shoved it into the mail slot with as much contempt as I could muster.

Monday, February 8, 2010

Pretending to Rock: Fake, Artificial, and Valuable Achievement

A while back, I discussed my experiences with the dangers of fake achievement and its potential for abuse. I'd become addicted, and regularly played RPGs to feel good about myself - I allowed myself to glow in the praise directed at my characters for their world-saving heroics, when all I'd really done is hit the right buttons enough times. Once I figured this out, and realized it was preventing me from accomplishing anything real, I set about the lengthy task of recovery. Step one was a game accomplishment that required skill rather than patience - collecting all the emblems in Sonic Adventure DX.

The response to this essay was... mixed, to say the least.

There was one comment in particular that raised an interesting question, which I would like to address today.